Top 10 Reasons to Adopt a Senior Cat

   

MiscPhoto-SeniorCatTop10-011. Aren’t you getting better with age? A cat does too!
A senior cat’s personality is already fully developed. That means you’ll know if a cat is a lap lover or free spirit and you’ll know if you’ve found a good fit for you and your family right away.

2. A senior cat has retired from the interior design business.
You won’t be coming home to knocked over plants, tipped over TVs, or toilet paper confetti.

3. Litter box as Zen garden.
A senior cat is most likely already house trained and will create beautiful works of art in the litter box as opposed to the living room.

4. What you see is what you get.
Because a senior cat is already full-grown, you can pick a cat in the size/weight class that suits you.

5. Crazy kitty hour is cancelled.
A senior cat is not likely to go running through your apartment in the wee hours of the night sounding like a Clydesdale.

MiscPhoto-SeniorCatTop10-026. A senior cat will pay attention to you.
A senior cat has a better attention span than a kitten. So, if you need to teach your new feline friend something — like how to use a scratching post (though he will most likely already know how) — your kitty is likely to pay attention and not bound off to chase that invisible dot on the wall.

7. He’s still got it!
A senior cat still has tons of playful energy and will let you know which playtime activities he prefers.

8. You can just hang with your homie in your home.
A senior cat will be happy to sit near you and take a nap while you watch TV, pay bills, read a book, or do other things. Not much can beat that feeling of companionship.

9. Remember, a cat has nine lives.
That means a senior cat most likely has some good years ahead of him — and his golden years may be his best ones yet! A cat is considered mature at age 7 and a senior at age 11. Many house cats live well into their late teens or even into their twenties. So, let the good times (and balls) roll!

10. You are doing your part for recycling.
A senior cat in a shelter knows what it’s like to be in a home and will be extremely grateful to be out of the shelter and in a home again. Senior cats are often the hardest to find homes for, so you will be literally saving a life. And, when your senior kittizen is curled up and purring, be sure to listen carefully: he just may be sharing stories of his past lives. Thanks to you, he has a future to purr about too.

Posted in Cats, Events & Campaigns, Maddie's Fund, Pet Adoption, Pet Care & Training | Leave a comment

Euthanasia of Dogs and Cats at NYC Shelters Hits Historic Low, Says Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals in 2013 Progress Report

3,098 pet adoptions happened in a single weekend during Maddie's Pet Adoption Days in NYC on June 1 & 2, 2013. (Photo by Dana Edelson)

3,098 pet adoptions happened in a single weekend during Maddie’s Pet Adoption Days in NYC on June 1 & 2, 2013. (Photo by Dana Edelson)

Euthanasia at AC&C drops for tenth straight year, giving NYC lowest euthanasia rate per capita of any major U.S. city

Wednesday, April 23, 2014 – New York, NY – New York City is nearer than ever to becoming a “no-kill” city, says the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals (the Alliance) in its just-published 2013 Progress Report.

The report, which details the progress made during the last year by the Alliance, a non-profit coalition of more than 150 animal shelters and rescue groups, reveals that euthanasia at Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C) declined for the tenth straight year, giving New York the lowest euthanasia rate per capita of any major U.S. city for the second consecutive year.

Jane Hoffman, president of the Alliance, said, “Through the efforts of our robust community coalition, we have transformed the way New York City treats its homeless animals and dramatically reduced the number of such animals who are killed each year. In the process, we have made New York a model of the kind of collaborative effort needed to save lives on a broad scale.”

The Alliance is a private 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization. It is not a City agency.

Below are highlights of how the Alliance and its member organizations are transforming New York City into a community where homeless animals have the promise of safe and loving homes:

AC&C Euthanasia Reduction

AC&C Transfers & Adoptions

AC&C Live Release Rate

Click on the images above to view larger versions of these charts documenting our 2003–2013 progress toward a no-kill New York City.

   

   

   

Significantly fewer animals are being killed.
In 2013, euthanasia of cats and dogs at AC&C dropped to an historic low, to 6,124 from 31,701 a decade ago. Behind the more than 80 percent decline is the success of the Alliance and its member groups, which include AC&C, in finding homes for more than 250,000 dogs and cats.

Transfer is the most effective tool for saving animal lives.
In 2013, of the 29,061 cats and dogs entering AC&C shelters, 51 percent, or 14,732, were transferred to partner rescue organizations dedicated to finding them homes — an increase of 167 percent from 2003, when 5,519 animals were transferred. Wheels of Hope, the Alliance’s transport fleet, carried the vast majority of these transferred animals in 2013, and has ferried almost 70,000 dogs and cats since the program’s 2005 launch — all at no cost to the groups and individuals served.

Spay/neuter efforts continue to drive down euthanasia.
Ensuring the availability of free and low-cost spay/neuter services has been critical to the Alliance’s success. In 2013, 60,000 surgeries were performed by Alliance member organizations, with the ASPCA alone handling more than 43,500 surgeries and The Humane Society of New York and The Toby Project contributing their veterinary services in significant numbers.

Feral Cat Initiative helps communities manage overpopulation crisis.
The Alliance’s New York City Feral Cat Initiative continued to reach out to feral cat caretakers in 2013, providing local communities with strategies and tools to manage cat overpopulation through Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR). The Alliance’s popular and free TNR-related workshops are given both locally and around the country.

Veterinary care for almost 1,000 cats and dogs.
In 2013, the Mayor’s Alliance Medical Fund, which is supported entirely by private donations, paid for care for 1,000 sick and injured cats and dogs awaiting adoption.

   

   

Learn More Save a Life. Donate Now.


Mayor's Alliance for NYC's AnimalsAbout the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals®
The Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity that works with more than 150 partner rescue groups and shelters to offer important programs and services that save the lives of NYC’s homeless animals. We are supported entirely by donations from foundations, corporations, and individuals and receive no government funding. Since our founding in 2003, we have remained committed to transforming New York City into a no-kill community by 2015, meaning that no dogs or cats of reasonable health and temperament will be killed merely because they do not have homes. www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org

Media Contact

Alix Friedman, LAK Public Relations, Inc.
Phone: (212) 329-1413
E-mail: afriedman@lakpr.com

Posted in Animal Care & Control of NYC, Cats, Dogs, Feral Cats & TNR, Pet Adoption, Press Release, Spay/Neuter, Wheels of Hope | Leave a comment

Alliance to Host “Strictly Seniors” Senior Cat Adoption Event on May 4

7-year-old orange tabby, Baxter, is just one of the Frankie’s Fund for Feline Care & Rescue senior cats who will be available for adoption at Cauz For Pawz Thrift Stores on May 4. (Photo by Melina Gabler)

7-year-old orange tabby, Baxter, is just one of the Frankie’s Fund for Feline Care and Rescue senior cats who will be available for adoption at Cauz For Pawz Thrift Stores on May 4. (Photo by Melina Gabler)

Tuesday, April 15, 2014 – New York, NY – On Sunday, May 4, the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals (the Alliance) will host Strictly Seniors, its first-ever adoption event for cats seven years and older. To bring attention to the hundreds of senior cats who need loving, forever homes, the Alliance is partnering with Frankie’s Fund for Feline Care and Rescue, a rescue group focusing exclusively on older cats, and Cauz For Pawz Thrift Stores, which raises money for animal rescue.

Strictly Seniors
Sunday, May 4, 2014
Noon–4:00 p.m.
Cauz For Pawz Thrift Stores, 212 East 23rd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues), New York, NY

Like senior dogs, senior cats are the elder statesmen of the animal world. While the attraction of kittens (and puppies) is undeniable, their mature counterparts have their own distinct charms and offer many advantages.

Senior cats make great pets, and not just for senior citizens, but for families and single people of all ages, as well. And when you adopt a senior pet, what you see is usually what you get; while they remain lively and full of charm, their personalities are already fully developed.

Instead of the high-energy play kittens require, older cats are happiest when they have a cozy lap to curl up in and a friendly hand to give their bellies and their ears a loving rub.

There are intangible benefits, too. Becoming the caregiver for an older pet is a transformative experience. In offering these animals a second chance at a loving, secure home, adopters get a warm, loving presence that brings with it that rarest of things: unconditional affection.

Here is a snapshot of three of the senior cats who will be available for adoption on Sunday, May 4:

MelinaGabler-BunnyHofbergCat-HARRIET
MelinaGabler-BunnyHofbergCat-BAXTER
MelinaGabler-BunnyHofbergCat-MILTON

Harriet is a 13-year-old Maine Coon who ended up at Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C) when her owner died. She is as sweet as she is beautiful. (Photo by Melina Gabler)

Baxter is a 7-year-old Domestic Shorthair whose owners surrendered him to Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C) when they could no longer care for him. He loves to “talk” and is friendly with everyone. (Photo by Melina Gabler)

Milton is an adorable 10-year-old Domestic Shorthair with an outgoing personality. He loves people and thrives on attention. (Photo by Melina Gabler)


Mayor's Alliance for NYC's AnimalsAbout the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals®
The Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity that works with more than 150 partner rescue groups and shelters to offer important programs and services that save the lives of NYC’s homeless animals. We are supported entirely by donations from foundations, corporations, and individuals and receive no government funding. Since our founding in 2003, we have remained committed to transforming New York City into a no-kill community by 2015, meaning that no dogs or cats of reasonable health and temperament will be killed merely because they do not have homes. www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org

Frankie's Fund for Feline Care and RescueAbout Frankie’s Fund for Feline Care & Rescue
Frankie’s Fund for Feline Care and Rescue, a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity, promotes the welfare of abandoned elderly and special needs cats by finding homes for them, either through adoption or through the Fund’s foster program. www.frankiesfelinefund.org

   

   

Cauz For Pawz Thrift StoresAbout Cauz For Pawz Thrift Stores
Cauz For Pawz Thrift Stores, a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity promotes the health and well-being of all animals by donating funds and supplies to animal shelters. We will create food pantries, neuter programs, and build farms. This will offer care and dignity to all animals. www.cauzforpawz.com

Media Contact

Courtney Savoia, LAK Public Relations, Inc.
Phone: (212) 329-1408
E-mail: csavoia@lakpr.com

Posted in Cats, Events & Campaigns, Pet Adoption, Press Release | Leave a comment

Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals and Humane Society of New York Team Up to Offer FREE Spay/Neuter Clinic for Rabbits

(Photo by David Lagville)

(Photo by David Lagville)

Free spay/neuter surgeries for rabbits will be provided by appointment on Saturday, April 5, 2014, at the Humane Society of New York Animal Clinic

Tuesday, March 25, 2014 – New York, NY – Easter bunnies are not a happy bunch. Nor, in many cases, are the families that acquire them.

Taking care of rabbits and socializing them takes a lot of time and effort — something parents who buy the cuddly pets for their children do not always realize. Nor are they always aware of their new pets’ prolific breeding habits. Suddenly there are litters of baby bunnies and new owners quickly start to feel in over their heads.

Many end up releasing their new pets outdoors, unaware that domestic rabbits cannot survive in the wild. Other owners give the pets up to animal shelters like Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C) and its rabbit adoption partner, NYC Metro Rabbit, the adoption program of Rabbit Rescue & Rehab. These organizations alone take in roughly 600 rabbits each year, making rabbits the third-largest animal shelter population after cats and dogs.

(Photo by Anna Bongiorno)

(Photo by Anna Bongiorno)

One way to cut back on the buyer’s remorse and resulting abandonment of rabbits is to make sure that the animals are spayed or neutered before or soon after they are brought home.

Anyone adopting from a rescue group or shelter receives a rabbit who already has been spayed or neutered. And now, even New Yorkers who have bought “intact” rabbits from pet shops can have their new pets spayed or neutered at no cost through the FREE Rabbit Spay/Neuter Clinic being offered jointly by the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals and the Humane Society of New York.

The free clinic will be held on Saturday, April 5, at the Humane Society of New York Animal Clinic (306 East 59th Street, between 1st and 2nd Avenues). Appointments must be made in advance by calling (212) 752-4842, and rabbit owners will be asked to bring their rabbits in for a free check-up a few days before the surgery. More rabbit spay/neuter clinics are planned; New Yorkers can check the Alliance website for information about future clinics.

   

   


(Photo by David Lagville)

(Photo by David Lagville)

Adopt a Rabbit!

Jane Hoffman, president of the Alliance, encourages New Yorkers who are considering adding a bunny or two to their families to adopt from rescue groups and shelters instead of buying rabbits from pet stores.

“Adopting offers many advantages,” explains Hoffman. “Like all New York City shelter animals, shelter rabbits are spayed or neutered before they are given to their adopters. And adoption counselors are terrific at matching people with pets and providing guidance on how to care for rabbits, which is very different from caring for cats and dogs.”

Among the many places New Yorkers can adopt rabbits are the Humane Society of New York; the Manhattan location of Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C); Petco’s East 86th Street and Union Square stores, which have rabbits and adoption counselors from NYC Metro Rabbit; and Brooklyn’s Sean Casey Animal Rescue.

   

   

   


Mayor's Alliance for NYC's AnimalsAbout the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals®
The Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity that works with more than 150 partner rescue groups and shelters to offer important programs and services that save the lives of NYC’s homeless animals. We are supported entirely by donations from foundations, corporations, and individuals and receive no government funding. Since our founding in 2003, we have remained committed to transforming New York City into a no-kill community by 2015, meaning that no dogs or cats of reasonable health and temperament will be killed merely because they do not have homes. www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org

The Humane Society of New YorkAbout the Humane Society of New York
Since 1904 the Humane Society of New York has been a presence in New York City, reaching out to animals in need when illness, injury, or homelessness strikes. Open 7 days a week, today its hospital and The Vladimir Horowitz and Wanda Toscanini Horowitz Adoption Center help more than 38,000 animals annually. HSNY’s adoption Center provides safe haven — with no time limit — for rescued animals while permanent adoptive homes are found. The clinic provides low-cost and funded veterinary services, including critical care for animals who would otherwise have nowhere to turn for life-giving help. To support the community, HSNY offers a range of free and low/cost spay/neuter options to protect animals’ health and prevent pet overpopulation. www.HumaneSocietyNY.org

Media Contact

Alix Friedman, LAK Public Relations, Inc.
Phone: (212) 329-1412
E-mail: afriedman@lakpr.com

Posted in Alliance Participating Organizations, Animal Care & Control of NYC, Events & Campaigns, Pet Adoption, Pet Care & Training, Press Release, Rabbits, Spay/Neuter | Leave a comment

A Reunion Between Rescued Dog and Rescuer

Nicky, a Pit Bull mix, and Doug Halsey enjoyed their reunion six years after Doug pulled Nicky from the city shelter and obtained funding from the Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals Medical Fund to get the dog's broken jaw repaired. (Photo by Tara Canty)

Nicky, a Pit Bull mix, and Doug Halsey enjoyed their reunion six years after Doug pulled Nicky from the city shelter and obtained funding from the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals Medical Fund to get the dog’s broken jaw repaired. (Photo by Tara Canty)

It had been six years since they’d last seen one another, but Nicky remembered Doug Halsey. The beautiful black-and-white Pit Bull mix enthusiastically greeted Doug, who now runs Ready for Rescue, an Alliance Participating Organization. Then he sat down by Doug’s side, mouth open, panting gently with excitement.

The fact that Nicky can open his mouth at all is due in large part to Doug’s caring and timely intervention in the dog’s life. As a volunteer at the time for A Cause for Paws, Doug received an e-mail from the New Hope program of Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C) about a dog that had been found on a Bronx rooftop who couldn’t open his mouth. No one had any idea how long Nicky had been in this condition. It was clear, however, that the dog had been hit with a blunt instrument and left to die. Luckily, someone called the police and Nicky was taken to AC&C’s Manhattan shelter, where Doug first met him.

“His jaw was locked shut so he could only stick his tongue out a little to lap up kibble and water,” Doug recalls. He pulled Nicky from the shelter and placed him in a foster home with Garo Alexanian, another long-time animal rescuer and caregiver. It was Garo, says Doug, who first suggested they see if it were possible to get the dog’s jaw repaired. Doug contacted the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals to see if Nicky qualified for financial assistance from the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals Medical Fund, a special fund that pays for lifesaving medical treatment for sick and injured animals awaiting adoption. Nicky was deemed an appropriate recipient and was taken to NYC Veterinary Specialists (now BluePearl) for surgery.

When Nicky first arrived at the city shelter, his jaw was so badly damaged he couldn't open his mouth.

When Nicky first arrived at the city shelter, his jaw was so badly damaged he couldn’t open his mouth.

“The initial diagnosis was extremely poor,” Doug remembers. “The vet was wonderful but had never done this kind of surgery before. She couldn’t even move Nicky’s mouth a quarter of an inch while he was under anesthesia.” The vet, according to Doug, wound up essentially rebuilding Nicky’s jaw. She cut out a section of Nicky’s cheekbone and then re-hinged the jaw.

The surgery was successful and, during post-operative care, a visit from Doug coincided with Nicky’s first open-mouthed yawn. Doug vividly remembers that emotional moment. “It was incredible,” he says. He quickly adds, chuckling, “His breath was unbelievably bad!”

When he was well enough to be released, Nicky returned to foster care with Garo. Shortly thereafter, Cathie Xenakis and her family, who were looking for a second dog to be a companion to their German Shepherd Abby, paid a visit to Garo. They initially wanted another German Shepherd, but the entire family, including Abby, found Nicky irresistible. “Out comes this dog,” recalls Cathie, “his face is crooked and he’s underweight but his tail is wagging. He’s as happy as can be. He was such a happy mess I fell in love with him!”

The Xenakis family adopted Nicky and whisked him off to their home in New Jersey, where the young dog continued to thrive. According to Cathie, “he grew up and grew out.” In the time he’s lived in his loving and nurturing home Nicky has gained more than 20 pounds and he now also boasts a sleek and shiny coat.

Happy and healthy — and handsome too! Rescued dog Nicky has come a long way from being abandoned on a rooftop in the Bronx. (Photo by Cathie Xenakis)

Happy and healthy — and handsome too! Rescued dog Nicky has come a long way from being abandoned on a rooftop in the Bronx. (Photo by Cathie Xenakis)

Nicky is an integral member of the family, having instantly formed bonds that have deepened over time. “He and Abby are like siblings,” says Cathie. The two spend their days together, playing and cuddling. But Nicky is also very much a “people dog,” Cathie says, laughing. “He’s such a goofball sometimes. When you come home he just runs around because he’s so happy.”

A happy Nicky is just who greeted Doug on Doug’s recent visit. And, while Nicky clearly remembered Doug, Doug has never forgotten Nicky either.

Nicky and his situation had such an impact on Doug that, at Ready for Rescue, which he founded in 2009, he has made rehabilitating injured and sick animals a main focus. “Nicky was the first animal I helped who needed special care,” he states. “He is the dog that inspired me to do the work I do today.”

Posted in Alliance Participating Organizations, Animal Care & Control of NYC, Dogs, Pet Adoption, Pet Fostering, Picasso Veterinary Fund | Leave a comment