Honor Senior Citizens Day, August 21, by Adopting a Senior Pet, Says Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals

Wisdom was found after Superstorm Sandy, walking in a deserted neighborhood. She had no form of identification and was taken to the city shelter, but no one stepped up to claim this sweet gentle lady. (Photo by Joe Galka)

Wisdom was found after Superstorm Sandy, walking in a deserted neighborhood. She had no form of identification and was taken to the city shelter, but no one stepped up to claim this sweet gentle lady. (Photo by Joe Galka)

New York, NY – Friday, August 16, 2013 – A beautiful, gentle, eight-year-old Pit mix named Wisdom was brought to a shelter after she was found wandering the streets post-Hurricane Sandy. Kiera, a charming 13-year-old tabby cat wound up at a shelter when her family relocated to Hawaii.

These and thousands of other senior animals, through no fault of their own, end up in New York City shelters and rescue facilities. While for some of them their coats may have lost their luster and their eyes may have dulled with age, these older animals have a lifetime of love to offer.

That’s why, in honor of Senior Citizens Day, Wednesday, August 21, the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals encourages New Yorkers who are thinking about adopting a pet (and those who may not have been!) to consider the elder statesmen of the dog-and-cat world. While the attraction of puppies and kittens is undeniable, their mature counterparts have their own charm and offer many advantages.

Senior animals make great pets — and not just for senior citizens, but for families and single people of all ages, as well. They are typically lower-maintenance than a puppy or kitten, since for most, their house-training and non-ending playtime days are behind them. And when you adopt a senior pet, generally “what you see is what you get” — their personalities are fully developed when you meet them. They are far more likely to just chill with you instead of chewing up slippers or turning your couch into their personal scratch pad.

There are intangible benefits, too. Becoming the caregiver for an older pet is a transformative experience. In offering these animals a second chance at a loving, secure home, owners get a warm, loving presence that brings with it that rarest of things: unconditional affection.

To learn more about adopting senior animals, visit www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org/adopt.

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Mayor's Alliance for NYC's AnimalsAbout the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals®
The Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity that works with more than 150 partner rescue groups and no-kill shelters to offer important programs and services to save the lives of NYC’s homeless animals. Receiving no government funding, we are supported by donations from foundations, corporations, and individuals. As we mark our tenth anniversary in 2013, we are committed to transforming New York City into a no-kill community by 2015: where no dogs or cats of reasonable health and temperament will be killed merely because they do not have homes. www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org

Media Contact

Alix Friedman, LAK Public Relations, Inc.
Phone: (212) 329-1412
E-mail: afriedman@lakpr.com

   

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