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Out of the Cage! The Blog of the Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals

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Betsey (brown/white) and Betty (white) were found as strays and treated for mange by American Bulldog Rescue. Betsey was recently adopted, and Betty will soon be ready for her new home. (Photo by Jodi Specter)

Betsey (brown/white) and Betty (white) were found as strays and treated for mange by American Bulldog Rescue. Betsey was recently adopted, and Betty will soon be ready for her new home.

Photo by Jodi Specter

Out of the Cage! (September 2010)

Bully Breeds Get Help from American Bulldog Rescue

Betsey and Betty. Barry, Maggie, and Cindy Lou. Marlon. And of course, Jelly. These are some of the faces of American Bulldog Rescue.

Since 1999, American Bulldog Rescue (ABR) has found loving homes for more than 1,000 bully breed dogs. They have successfully placed American and English Bulldogs as well as other large, solidly built dogs of a variety of Molosser breeds, including Mastiffs, Boxers, and others.

After being treated by ABR for a stomach obstruction, Barry found an adoptive home complete with a Bulldog big brother. (Photo by Jodi Specter)

After being treated by ABR for a stomach obstruction, Barry found an adoptive home complete with a Bulldog big brother.

Photo by Jodi Specter

American Bulldog Rescue is a member of the New York Breed Rescue Network of the Mayor's Alliance, and many of the dogs they take in were transferred from Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C) and transported to their ABR foster homes on Mayor's Alliance transport vans. Some were abused or neglected; others were simply abandoned by their owners. ABR is dedicated to giving these dogs the opportunity to live lives of love and happiness, with people who can care for them.

ABR isn't a shelter. Instead, it's a network of foster volunteers who love and care for these wonderful dogs until their forever family is found. These foster families understand the needs of the breeds in their care, and they are prepared to care for each dog until an appropriate adopter is found. They provide the love, attention, understanding, training, patience, medical care, proper nourishment and housing, and companionship that give each dog the confidence and temperament to become a welcome family member.

Jodi Specter is one of the ABR volunteers who dedicates time and energy to rescuing and preparing bully breed dogs for their new homes. Jodi was delighted to share with us some of her success stories.

Maggie lost her home after moving from Georgia to New York, but found a great new family in Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jodi Specter)

Maggie lost her home after moving from Georgia to New York, but found a great new family in Pennsylvania.

Photo by Jodi Specter

Sisters Betsey and Betty were strays, picked up in a park. Both dogs suffered from demodectic mange when they were rescued. Neither Betsey nor Betty had ever lived indoors or had a clue about how to enjoy a walk with their person or a fun ride in a car. ABR got them the medical treatment they needed, and found a perfect adopter for Betsey. She now has a big brother named Gus. Betty is still in foster care with ABR to overcome a little shyness when meeting new people, but will soon be available for adoption.

After a lifetime of neglect, sweet Cindy is gaining much-needed weight and is no longer suffering from a painful eye condition, thanks to ABR. (Photo by Jodi Specter)

After a lifetime of neglect, sweet Cindy is gaining much-needed weight and is no longer suffering from a painful eye condition, thanks to ABR.

Photo by Jodi Specter

Barry came to ABR very sick and required surgery for a major obstruction in his stomach. But he recovered beautifully, and was adopted by a family with an eight-year-old American Bulldog.

Maggie moved to New York from Georgia with her original family, which included several children and a small dog. When their new landlord said Maggie wasn't welcome, she ended up at the AC&C shelter on Staten Island. ABR took her in and found an adoptive Pennsylvania family that worships her. (Read a related article about tenants' rights to keep their pets.)

Cindy has a Cinderella story. She's the sweetest, most gentle girl — but unfortunately, has probably been neglected her entire life. At 94 pounds, she was about 30 pounds underweight when the Mayor's Alliance transport van delivered her to Jodi. She suffered from skin and eyelid problems, not unusual for her breed. But she's becoming a princess! With good food and loving care, her weight is up to 105 pounds, she's had her eyes done (entropian surgery to correct an extremely uncomfortable eyelid condition that causes eyelids to fold inward, resulting in the eyelashes rubbing against the cornea), her skin is improving, and she's been spayed. According to Jodi, the hefty medical bill of more than $1,500 was worth it — Cindy has become a princess!

Marlon is amazing! He gets along with everyone — two- and four-footed alike. Although he suffered from severe demodectic mange when he first came to ABR, regular treatment baths have improved his skin's condition considerably. Marlon also receives accupuncture twice a week to boost his immune system. As you can see from his photos, Marlon looks great today. He's housebroken, and walks beautifully on a leash.

Adopted by ABR volunteer Jodi Specter, Jelly (back) has become a co-trainer and cheerleader for other ABR rescue dogs like Marlon (front). (Photo by Jodi Specter)

Adopted by ABR volunteer Jodi Specter, Jelly (back) has become a co-trainer and cheerleader for other ABR rescue dogs like Marlon (front).

Photo by Jodi Specter

Jelly came to ABR a little more than a year ago. Jodi took him in, and says, "It was a new beginning in my life. I had never had such an empty dog." Jelly's family had turned him in to AC&C suffering from skin and eyelid problems typical for his breed. Jelly also suffered from a thyroid condition. ABR got Jelly the medical care he needed, including entropion surgery. "He's a high-maintenance kid, but he has become my son and best friend," says Jodi. "He helps my foster dogs learn how to have fun and trust people and other dogs. I don't know how I ever lived without him." He is now Jelly Specter, permanent member of the family.

And so ABR will continue to provide homeless bully breed dogs with the care, medical attention, and love they need before moving on to permanent homes. If you'd like to learn more about ABR, explore adoption or foster opportunities, or support their efforts in other ways, visit the American Bulldog Rescue website. ABR operates solely on the generous donations of bully-breed lovers, so every dollar donated goes directly to helping a homeless dog.

 

Special Event for Alliance Participating Organizations!

On October 6, the Mayor's Alliance will host a special Strength Training for its Alliance Participating Organizations (APOs): "A Bully Breed Briefing" presented by Jacque Schultz, MA, CPDT-KA, Senior Director of ASPCA Community Initiatives. The workshop will focus on identifying the different bully breeds and understanding their unique characteristics. APOs interested in attending should contact Barbara Tolan at barbara@AnimalAllianceNYC.org.